Questions & Answers About Lice and Super Lice

Children 3 to 11 are most susceptible to acquiring lice because they exposed to large groups of other children.  Children are also more playful and have more hair to hair contact with other children. According to the CDC there are an estimated 6 to 12 million infestations that occur each year in the U.S. among children 3 to 11 years of age.

Super lice are the same as normal head lice apart from a genetic mutation that makes them resistant to pyrethroids.  Pyrethroids are the group of insecticides contained in common over-the-counter lice treatments used to kill head lice.  Lice with this mutation were first discovered in 2000 and nearly all lice now are super lice.

The difference between super lice and regular lice is super lice have a genetic mutation that makes them resistant to pyrethroids, the family of insecticides that are contained in common lice treatments purchased over the counter.  Over the counter lice treatment products no longer work on lice (which are now super lice).

Super lice and regular head lice can’t live without a human host for more than 24 hours.  Head lice are “human” parasites and require human blood to survive.

Super lice look just like regular lice.  There is no visual difference. Super lice have a genetic mutation that makes them resistant to pyrethroids.

Super lice, like regular head lice, are not dangerous and do not spread disease.  They are a nuisance and easily spread from person to person through hair contact.

Nits are lice eggs that are laid at the base of the hair shaft near the scalp.  Nits are firmly attached to the hair and are very difficult to pry loose. Only the adult female head louse lays eggs.  Nits usually take 8 to 9 days to hatch and nits that are ready to hatch are usually located less than a quarter inch from the base of the hair shaft.  Nits that are found farther than a quarter inch away from the base of hair shaft have most likely already hatched and what you see are simply empty casings.

A nymph is an immature louse, not an adult louse yet.  A nymph looks like an adult louse but is smaller. A nymph matures into an adult in 9 to 12 days after hatching from the nit.

There is no way to tell super lice from regular lice, apart from testing them in a lab. Just assume all lice are super lice.  Super lice have been identified in every State and most of all lice are now super lice. They are all mutating and becoming resistant to pyrethroids.  Pyrethroids are the group of insecticides contained in common over the counter lice treatments used to kill head lice.

There is no real cause for head lice apart from hair to hair contact, which is the way they are transferred.  The cause of lice has nothing to do with hygiene.

There are no reasons people get lice apart from hair to hair contact, which is the way lice are transferred.  They are simply parasites that need human blood to survive. The cause of lice has nothing to do with hygiene.

Head lice have been around forever, like many other insects and they are worldwide.  Dead head lice and their eggs have even been found on the hair and scalps of Egyptian mummies and are also mentioned in the Bible.

Head lice can live approximately 30 days on a human host but can’t live for more than 24 hours without a human host.  A female louse, which is slightly larger than a male, can lay up to 8 eggs per day and the eggs hatch in approximately 7 to 10 days.  It takes 7 to 10 more days for the louse to mature and lay their eggs.

Head lice are not dangerous and do not spread disease.  According to the CDC head lice should not be considered a medical or public health hazard.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics and National Association of School Nurses it’s safe to allow kids to go home for treatment and then return to school the next day. Be aware that school head lice policies are determined by local school boards.

You may not notice you have lice for a few weeks, especially if it’s your first time.  The most common symptom is itching. When a louse bites it causes an allergic reaction that causes itching.  However, you may not feel the itching right away, especially if it’s a light infestation. Another symptom is a tickling feeling of something moving on your head or hair.

First, ask your child if they have had any itching or tickling feeling on the scalp or hair?  Second, wet the child’s hair with water. This makes it easier to spot them. Then use a fine-toothed comb to part your child’s hair at various sections, especially behind the ears and lower back of the head.  Shine a bright light onto their scalp so you can see better. If there is an infestation of lice, you will see small light brown insects the size of a sesame seed moving on the hair or you may see the nits, which look whiter, stuck to the hair.

There are no tips or tricks to completely keep head lice at bay.  If there is head to head contact and lice have a chance to latch on to hair of a new host, they will. 

Dyed hair does not kill lice and does not keep head lice away. As long as they can grab on to hair and make their way down to the head where its food supply is (human blood), lice don’t care if hair is dyed or not.

There are no over-the-counter treatments that kill super lice.  The CDC, American Academy of Pediatrics and National Association of School Nurses recommend going to a certified professional.

Super lice have a genetic mutation that makes them resistant to pyrethroids.  Pyrethroids are the group of insecticides contained in common over-the-counter lice treatments used to kill head lice.  Lice with this mutation were first discovered in 2000 and have now been discovered in every State in the Country. It is believed that all lice are now super lice.

There are no over-the-counter treatments that kill head lice anymore because regular head lice have mutated and are resistant to over the counter lice treatment products.  The CDC, American Academy of Pediatrics and National Association of School Nurses recommend going to a certified professional.

It is believed all head lice have mutated to be super lice.  Super lice have a genetic mutation that makes them resistant to pyrethroids.  Pyrethroids are the group of insecticides contained in common over-the-counter lice treatments used to kill head lice.  Lice with this mutation were first discovered in 2000 and have now been discovered in every State in the Country.

Head lice are almost exclusively found on the scalp.  It is very uncommon for lice to be found on the eyelashes or eyebrows.  They prefer the scalp because of the thin skin and thickness of the head hair because they can grip it more firmly with their claws.

Head lice spread from person to person through hair contact.  Although it is possible for them to spread by way of pillows, head rests, hair brushes, hats and other items close to the head, it is not common.  Lice can’t live for more than 24 hours without a human host.

Head lice spread from person to person through hair contact.  Although it is possible for them to spread by way of pillows, head rests, hair brushes, hats and other items close to the head, it is not common.  Lice can’t live for more than 24 hours without a human host.

Head lice spread from person to person through hair contact.  Although it is possible for them to spread by way of pillows, head rests, hair brushes, hats and other items close to the head, it is not common.  Lice can’t live for more than 24 hours without a human host.

Head lice are “human” parasites and require human blood to survive.  To clean bedding or other items vacuuming is the best option for removing lice.  It is most likely if there are lice, they will be attached to a hair follicle, so it’s more important to focus your vacuuming on loose hair.  You can also wash and dry items or simply set them aside for a couple days. Head lice can’t live without a human host for more than 24 hours.  Avoid pesticidal sprays and other lice treatments sold over-the-counter because they do not kill lice.

Head lice are “human” parasites and need “human” blood to survive.  They do not live on animals.